Return to Website

ATL - HANK WILLIAMS MESSAGE BOARD AND FORUM

www.tinyurl.com/alabamatalkline

"It's All about Hank" Feel free to post a message about Hank Williams and His Music.
 

Unfortunately, due to heavy SPAM, we have been obliged to LOCK this forum.
If you wish to post a message, send email to internetaction@yahoo.com and we will post it for you.

 

 

Alabama Talk Line Message Forum
This Forum is Locked
Author
Comment
View Entire Thread
Faron Young & Marty Robbins Newsletter Wed, Mar 30, 2011



Faron Young & Marty Robbins Newsletter
Wed, March 30, 2011




This periodic newsletter commemorates the lives of Faron Young and Marty Robbins. The University of Illinois Press published Live Fast, Love Hard: The Faron Young Story in 2007 and is publishing Twentieth Century Drifter: The Life of Marty Robbins in the spring of 2012. The manuscript will be assigned to a copy editor in April. (Finally!)

FARON YOUNG ON SAINT PATRICK'S DAY 1977
Seven years after I first met Faron and the Deputies, they came to the Wagonwheel Ballroom in Oklahoma City. This was Faron's second Oklahoma appearance after the end of the rigged indecent exposure lawsuit in Tulsa. His first had been to Tulsa in December 1976, and I'd driven up from OKC for that. I was thrilled when they actually came to the city where I lived. In these photos, Faron is posing for me. Ray Emmett and Richard Bass are also there. Cootie Wayne, Leon Boulanger, and Al Lewis were the other members of the band.

Elizabeth Taylor 1932-2011

Faron Young enjoyed talking about him and Johnny Cash and Elizabeth Taylor being born at the same time. "Tomorrow is Johnny Cash and Liz Taylor's birthday," he told Ralph Emery in 1986. "They'll be 54. I'm one day older than Johnny Cash. I don't believe it. He looks like he's 175 years old. I'll go along with Liz Taylor." Ralph told him, "Yeah, you'd go along anywhere with Liz Taylor." I have another quote where Faron talks about Liz ignoring his birthday greeting, but I can't find it.

LETTERS
Red Freeman writes, "Diane, always glad to see your current news. I visited with my old boss Sherwin Linton in Minneapolis last summer and we talked about how much we appreciate your continuing work on country music history."

Gerald Walton reports, "Just wanted to tell you that your Faron Young book is in the metro Oklahoma City library 4 copies."

Pam Dyson says, "I'd like to receive your email newsletters. While reading your Faron bio I jotted down all the addresses of homes, businesses, etc. Last fall while visiting my daughter who lives in Nashville we looked up the addresses. The boarding house owned by Mom Upchurch was not far from where my daughter was living. I was surprised to see the Young Executive Building still bears that name."

Colin Alderson writes from South Australia, "Just a note to say how much I enjoy reading your newslatters and reading other people's letters and tributes - excellent. If you can give Peter Trenholm my e-mail address I can help him with some of the Marty tracks he asked for. I can't wait for the Marty Biography to come out."

Les Leverett in Nashville says, "Diane, thanks for the newsletter. I am glad to get this word on Joe Wright. I haven't seen nor heard of him in years and wondered if he was still around Nashville."

Merlin Robin writes, "I just finished reading the book on Faron Young that you wrote. I salute you, very good job. I had a lot of different emotions as I read. The reason why is my father and my wife`s father were alcoholics. They had the same behavior as stated about Faron. It was pitiful in a way, especially him being in the position he was. He could have had it made. But I can relate to his children. They never felt love. Me neither. Again I say thank you!!!!"

Tim Ceska says, "I am a devotee of classic country - loved the Faron Young book and will be purchasing the Marty Robbins book as soon as it becomes available."

John Hamilton writes, "I always enjoy the Sideman Sidebar in your newsletters, so I wanted to share with you my thoughts on one of the greatest sidemen of all time--Ralph Mooney. The steel guitar, in my opinion, is the one instrument that says 'this is country music' more than any other single instrument. Fiddles, mandolins, guitars and other stringed instruments are common to music genres around the world. But when the steel guitar is plugged into the mix, it's country! Think of it as Hawaii's contribution, and the unpublicized reason the U.S. decided to make Hawaii the 50th state in 1959: it was payment for their amazing contribution to our country's music."

Continued Below:

Continued: Faron Young & Marty Robbins Newsletter Wed, Mar 30, 2011

Continued from above:

A reader reports, "The Marty Robbins Spotlight show is now available on DVD. You can order by calling 1-800-820-5405. The cost is $136 for the entire collection. There are 10 DVDs. It is being produced by Ronny Robbins and Larry Black who also produces Country Family Reunion. Their website is http://www.cfrvideos.com. Please let your readers know."

Linda Elliott Clark writes from Alexandria, VA, "Very interesting newsletter this month Diane. A lot of good info. I agree with John Krebs about Webb Pierce. He did have a unique voice, and I have not heard anyone sound like him since. Also agree about Mel Tillis. Another great one that I had the opportunity to see in person on several occasions in the late 60s. Would be great to see stories on these two fine performers."

David Corne (Tarquin 45 of youtube) sends this message from the United Kingdom: "Thank heaven for youtube. How great to be able to see Marty's four appearances on the Cash shows from the early 70s. To see Marty sing 'The Master's Call' (one of his very best cowboy songs) as well as the most un-Marty song 'Jolie Girl' was sheer delight. People who often want to know what Marty was like should go to youtube and hear what Larry Gatlin says about him. Just tap in Larry Gatlin ACM and also 'Marty Stuart ACM' who tells how his mother named him after Marty Robbins. I'm quite proud of the fact that I have posted more video clips of Marty on youtube than anyone else in the world and I have helped to keep the magic of Marty alive. It's my way of paying tribute to his undoubted genius. I've been a Country fan for most of my life and most of the artists whose records I bought have long gone, but Ray Price, Jimmy Dickens, Sonny James, Slim Whitman, Charley Pride, Merle Haggard and Willie Nelson are still with us. In my opinion, no one has ever come close to the all-round talent that Marty Robbins had. He just had it all; the most beautiful of voices that could sing any genre and his songwriting was as impressive and versatile as his vocal ability. I await your book with interest and anticipation."

And this great news from Conrad Noddin: "After reading some of these comments from people who still want to hear things about Marty, I decided to upload the Tribute song I wrote and recorded - 'Marty My Friend.' Your contacts can hear it from our online magazine Nashville Newzine at http://www.nashvillenewzine.com/MartyRobbins.html. They can also feel free to download the song by clicking on the little triangle to the farthest right on the play bar."

SIDEMAN SIDEBAR
Conrad Noddin quit his job with Freddie Hart in 1979 on the chance Marty Robbins would hire him to play trumpet and piano. He called Marty, who asked if he had a black suit and then told him to be at the Friday Night Opry. Conrad thought he would be introduced to the band members. "So I'm back there," Conrad recalls, "and I have on my black suit, and he goes, 'Okay, let's go.' And I said, 'What do you mean?' He said, 'You're going to play piano.' And it was televised, live, I'd never played with them before, I didn't even know all their names. So I march out on stage, and I'm sitting behind the piano. He comes to this one song, and I'd never heard it in my life. I remember to this day, it was in the key of E flat, and all of a sudden he turns to me and he points, and here the camera comes. I played something, and it seemed to go fine." About playing both piano and trumpet, Conrad explains, "I would play the left hand of the piano, the bass part and some chords, while I had the trumpet up against my lips. Some people's brains can do it and some can't; mine just happened to. I didn't know it at the time until I tried it." Conrad can now be found at Nashville Newzine and Malibu Video Productions in Spring Hill, Tennessee.

Diane Diekman
Sioux Falls, South Dakota, USA
diane@dianediekman.com
Live Fast, Love Hard: http://dianediekman.com/?page_id=27
Navy Greenshirt: http://dianediekman.com/?page_id=4
A Farm In the Hidewood: http://dianediekman.com/?page_id=3
http://www.marykay.com/ddiekman/
www.buymyemptyhouse.com


Faron Young & Marty Robbins Newsletter Wed, Apr 6, 2011



Faron Young & Marty Robbins Newsletter
Wed, April 6, 2011




This periodic newsletter commemorates the lives of Faron Young and Marty Robbins. The University of Illinois Press published Live Fast, Love Hard: The Faron Young Story in 2007 and is publishing Twentieth Century Drifter: The Life of Marty Robbins in the spring of 2012. The remaining 900 copies of Live Fast, Love Hard will have the covers stripped, and they will be rebound into paperbacks and issued in tandem with Twentieth Century Drifter. So if you haven't purchased your hardcover copy, time is running out. There will eventually be a true paperback edition of Live Fast, Love Hard if the book keeps selling.

MARTY ROBBINS AT WEMBLEY IN 1976
Marty Robbins made his second Wembley festival appearance in England on 18 April 1976. He told his audience, "We were here last year, and I got quite a surprise, because it was my first visit to the country here, and I really didn't think people knew me or many of my records, y'know, and it was a good surprise, because any time anybody asked for a song, it was mine. It wasn't Johnny Cash, or somebody else, y'know, and it made me very happy. . . . In fact, I wish I could have been born here. If it ever happens again, I want it to take place right here. . . . I hope we will do some songs here that you like. The songs we're gonna do are mostly repeats of last year, because, y'know, I've only had so many records that made it. It doesn't take me long to sing my hits. Two times will do it." He was honored with the "Best International Vocalist" award. (Thanks to Bill Hulme for sending me a CD with portions of Marty's Wembley performances.)

LETTERS
When I wrote Bill Anderson a condolence note on the death of Ferlin Husky, he responded with, "Working with Faron and Ferlin was like going to school every night. Obviously, they taught me some things I didn't need to know....but all the good things I learned from them more than made up for the rest."

Sandy Jennings says, "A friend of mine lent me her copy of the Faron Young biography that you wrote. I found it compelling and very insightful. She also emailed me a copy of your newsletter. If possible I would like to be put on the mailing list for the next one. Thanks so much...Can't wait for the Marty Robbins bio."

Arie den Dulk writes from the Netherlands, "I got a promotion e- mail from UK Amazon.com today. Guess what book came first in line? Amazon.co.uk recommends Live Fast, Love Hard: The Faron Young Story (Music in American Life) and more."

Gerald Walton says, "I enjoyed your book on Faron Young. Now I have a question. I am a Hank Thompson fan BIG TIME. Do you know of any books about him? Would you think about doing one on him?"
Response: Hank wrote his autobiography, and it was published about the time of his death.

Tom Lipscombe in Canada says, "Thanks for your always entertaining newsletter...I enjoy reading the enthusiastic and complimentary comments about your work, from the contributors to this valuable resource. I have posted it at: http://pub3.bravenet.com/forum/static/show.php?usernum=243824250&frmid=204&msgid=817216&cmd=show

Bobbe Seymour of Steel Guitar Nashville writes from Hendersonville, Tennessee, "Thinking about my wonderful times working with Faron brings tears of sadness and tears of happiness. I miss him very deeply, what a multi faceted personality he had. God bless you Diane for keeping him alive in our memories."

SIDEMAN SIDEBAR
Former Country Deputy steel player Jerry Murhar became a trucker, and my sister and I met him in Tampa in February 2000. He picked us up at our hotel in his purple and stainless-steel Kenworth 18-wheeler and took us out to eat. Then we sat in the truck as he popped cassettes into his tape player and showed us the steel licks on a bunch of great country recordings. He told us the singers could have the middles; just leave the steel players the beginnings and ends. He took Kayo to the airport and insisted on driving up to the front of the terminal to drop her off. Backing down, he hit something and damaged his truck. We saw him again in 2005 when he came to one of my Deputy reunions.

Diane Diekman
Sioux Falls, South Dakota, USA
diane@dianediekman.com
Live Fast, Love Hard: http://dianediekman.com/?page_id=27
Navy Greenshirt: http://dianediekman.com/?page_id=4
A Farm In the Hidewood: http://dianediekman.com/?page_id=3
http://www.marykay.com/ddiekman/

Faron Young & Marty Robbins Newsletter Wed, Apr 27, 2011



Faron Young & Marty Robbins Newsletter
Wed, April 6, 2011




This periodic newsletter commemorates the lives of Faron Young and Marty Robbins. The University of Illinois Press published Live Fast, Love Hard: The Faron Young Story in 2007 and is publishing Twentieth Century Drifter: The Life of Marty Robbins in the spring of 2012.

Update on publication of Twentieth Century Drifter: The Life of Marty Robbins: I should be receiving the copyedited manuscript in June, with several weeks to go over that to agree/disagree with the copyeditor's changes and to make any other changes I want. The next time I'll see it will be in September, in page format. Then I'll prepare the index and make minor corrections.

FARON YOUNG SINGS "TWIN FIDDLES TURN ME ON"
In April 1987 Faron debuted a new song, "Twin Fiddles Turn Me On," on the Nashville Now television show. Ralph Emery, the host, said, "Let's talk about the song you were just doing. Plug that." Faron replied, "I just recorded that. We're going to release this in Canada. Just in Canada, alone. I found a place to put a record out up there, with a new label, that my ex-wife can't get part of the money." Whatever happened with that release, I don't know. The song was included on his last album of new songs, Here's To You, produced by Ray Pennington on Step One Records in mid-1988.

LETTERS
Annette Salmi in Phoenix, Arizona, has a request: "I met you when you came to phx az to get information to put in your book about Marty. My mom and I was friends with Marty and his family. You came to see me at my condo. I'm trying to sell my Marty Robbins 78 records due to financial distress. I was wondering if you knew anyone who may be interested. Marty's mother gave them to my mother. Marty sent them all to his mom. I believe I have 22. I want them to go to a true Marty fan." If anyone is interested in these historic 78s, contact Annette at annette12256@yahoo.com.

David Corne writes from the UK, "I received the new Marty Robbins Spotlight series from the States today. I've had the series on 'unofficial' video before where the sound and vision left a lot to be desired, so it's nice to see this particular series in pristine color and sound. It was sad to see Marty looking unwell in some of them, but he was still worth watching and listening to. I'm hoping that there will be further releases from this series in the future as I know for a fact there's plenty more shows (at least 12) that can be released."

Bobbe Seymour in Nashville says, "God bless you sweet girl for your wonderful work on these two great buddies of mine, I loved and respected them both, through thick and thin. I don't know why you do this but I end up saying good things about them myself."

Noel Clarke writes from Australia, "I just finished reading your retirement speech which I enjoyed very much. Just from reading that speech makes me feel like I know you. You seem to be one hell-of-a-woman and that I can assure you is meant as a compliment of the highest order. I have built a number of website over the past 14 years 2 of which are about Marty Robbins who is an all time favorite of mine. The first site was built for a lady from Indiana. Her name is Helen Shields, though I never met her in person I spoke to her a couple of time by telephone and exchanged many emails. The website is http://www.martyrobbins.250x.com. The other one built for myself and has a lot less information is http://www.martyrobbins2003.250x.com A friend here in Australia sent me your email with your April 6 newsletter for which I am very grateful. His name is Colin Alderson and comes from Adelaide area in South Australia. Colin has sent me many items of the Great man Marty I guess Col would have the best collection of Marty recordings in Australia. He has also spent time with Marty's twin sister Mamie."

Continued Below:

Continued: Faron Young & Marty Robbins Newsletter Wed, Apr 27, 2011

Continued from above:

Jody Nix sends this note from Big Spring, Texas: "Great reading. It is always good. You are great at this and you know I am one of the biggest fans Marty and Faron ever had......I would like for you to tune in to my radio show Sunday Night at 7 pm at www.kbygradio.com. I am kicking off the show with Singin' The Blues......you will have to download winamp and then click to listen and it should load for you. I am playing Traditional Country and Western Swing."
NEW CD BY JODY NIX AND THE TEXAS COWBOYS
Jody Nix sent me his latest CD, Twin Fiddles Turn Me On,, and I've listened to it over and over and over. I especially keep repeating "She's Killin' Me" for the great western swing and "Angel Judy" for the great steel guitar. Actually, all twelve songs are great. You can find it at http://www.jodynix.com.

SIDEMAN SIDEBAR
Richard Barish, who used the stage name of Richard Bass, joined Faron Young's Country Deputies in late 1972 and stayed with the band until Faron stopped touring in 1993. He attended my 2005 Deputy reunion, and he played at the book release/band reunion on the Midnite Jamboree in November 2007. Shortly thereafter, he moved to the Philippines so he could party in high style. Richard lives in Sabang, Mindoro Oriental, and stays in touch with his old world via Facebook.

Diane Diekman
Sioux Falls, South Dakota, USA
diane@dianediekman.com
Live Fast, Love Hard: http://dianediekman.com/?page_id=27
Navy Greenshirt: http://dianediekman.com/?page_id=4
A Farm In the Hidewood: http://dianediekman.com/?page_id=3
http://www.marykay.com/ddiekman/
www.buymyemptyhouse.com


Faron Young & Marty Robbins Newsletter Wed, May 24, 2011



Faron Young & Marty Robbins Newsletter
Wed, May 24, 2011




This periodic newsletter commemorates the lives of Faron Young and Marty Robbins. The University of Illinois Press published Live Fast, Love Hard: The Faron Young Story in 2007 and is publishing Twentieth Century Drifter: The Life of Marty Robbins in the spring of 2012.

MARTY ROBBINS 35 YEARS AGO AT THE INDY 500
On May 30, 1976, Marty Robbins drove the pace car for the Indianapolis 500. Former winners usually filled that role, although actor James Garner had driven the previous year. "When it was first suggested to me that I was being considered, I didn't think I had much of a chance of being selected," Marty told an interviewer. "It's something that is really big to do." He spent a week in Indianapolis, attending various functions but performing no concerts, and he rode in the festival parade on Saturday. Marty had never before appeared in front of a crowd as large as 400,000 people. At the signal, "Gentlemen, start your engines," he climbed into the 1976 Buick Century Custom coupe. With a former Indy winner in the passenger seat, Marty led 33 drivers on the parade lap. The speed of 40 miles an hour allowed engines to warm up while drivers took one more look at the track. Then came the pace lap. Marty steadily increased speed while racers behind him stayed three abreast and evenly aligned. At the end of this second lap, Marty pulled off. "I was probably going 100 miles per hour when I left the track to pull into the pit apron," he said. "It was a pretty big thrill." He received accolades for getting the race off to a safe and smooth start. It began better than it ended; the race was called for rain at the halfway point.



LETTERS

Don Powell sends this sad news, "I wanted to let you know that my wife, K. Phyllis Powell, passed away on April 13th. She had Parkinson's disease and was in a care center for over a year. I'm sure you recall she was Faron's secretary for several years. Since she made sure the band members were paid, most of the musicians will remember her. She used to tell me stories about artists that would come in to visit Faron, Roger Miller, George Jones, all his friends and she became friends with all of them. She was there during the time the Faron Young building was being built. She had to handle all the contractors, renting the offices, paying all the bills, even all his personal bills. She is greatly missed!!!!"

Response: Don, I'm so sorry to hear about Phyllis's death. Yes, I remember our phone interview and the stories she told about the new building.

Dorothy McGuffin wants to know what eleven movies Faron was in.
Response: My list comes to 8 movies, with 11 names. Faron starred in the first four and was himself as country music star in the second four: Hidden Guns (originally called Hired Guns), Daniel Boone Trail Blazer, Raiders of Old California (first called Stampede and then Six Guns and a Gavel), Country Music Holiday, Second Fiddle to a Steel Guitar, Road To Nashville, That's Country, and Nashville Rebel.

Andy Williford writes, "During one of our high school reunions, which Faron attended, they made a video in which the opening was a picture of the school, members of the class standing on the front steps, and various other memorable pictures of football games parties and of course the prom. At the beginning of the tape and throughout, they played the duet that Faron and Willie Nelson made together, 'Funny how time slips away.' You talk about a tear jerker. Yes I did cry."

A reader named Audrey asks, "In all your research do you know if Marty Robbins ever sang the song 'Tiny Bubbles'? l could quit looking if l knew that he never did. I am a fan and am trying to get a list of all his songs for my collection."
Response: He knew a thousand songs, and he may have sung it at some time on his shows. It isn't listed as anything he ever recorded.

Richard Spooner says, "Just a short mail to say thanks for putting me back in touch with Ray Emmett. We met up two weeks ago in Nashville when I was visiting. What a nice guy -- so many Faron stories. I think I could write a book!!! Not as good as yours though, I read it from time to time just to remember the guy."

Continued Below:

Continued: Faron Young & Marty Robbins Newsletter Wed, May 24, 2011

Continued from above:

Jim Boatright writes from Mesquite, Nevada, "Faron produced an album for me in 1973 in his Hall of Fame Studio and Richard Bass played lead guitar. After the two day session, Faron convinced me to join him in a case of Country Club malt liquor. He then drove me back to my hotel in his blue Lincoln Mk4. Corners didn't mean a thing to Faron. He just ran over them. I was sure glad to get there alive. I sure miss him, he was a great guy and a super entertainer."

Wanda Anderson says, "Well, the spring of 2012 is not so far away be sure to let us know how we can prepay and get the first book as they roll out. Am anxious for this to be released. I hope you can work a day at Country Music Hall of Fame with showing of the Spotlight shows they are marketing now. I live in Nashville and would be happy to help you in some way."

SIDEMAN SIDEBAR
Joe Babcock left Nebraska and was trying to survive as a musician in Los Angeles in 1958 when Tompall Glaser called and asked if he wanted to work for Marty Robbins as part of the Glaser trio. Joe stayed with Marty for six years, as backup singer and piano player. "We played a lot of dances out in Texas, so I started playing piano on the dances," Joe recalls. "It was sort of a learn-as-you-go-type thing. I got to where I could play a few things, and got a little better at it. So that's how I became a piano player." Joe and his family still perform in Nashville. Check them out at http://thebabcocks.com/. Joe helped me arrange the Marty Robbins band reunion in July 2008, and he introduced me to Jim Glaser when we all went to lunch together.

Diane Diekman
Sioux Falls, South Dakota, USA
diane@dianediekman.com
Live Fast, Love Hard: http://dianediekman.com/?page_id=27
Navy Greenshirt: http://dianediekman.com/?page_id=4
A Farm In the Hidewood: http://dianediekman.com/?page_id=3
http://www.marykay.com/ddiekman/
www.buymyemptyhouse.com